A busy Saturday in Lansing

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Saturday in Lansing

An elementary school garage sale, a Village-sponsored shredding event, 1,000 boxes of free food, Early Voting, and decorated scarecrows

by Josh Bootsma and Melanie Jongsma

LANSING, Ill. (October 24, 2020) – Schools, churches, businesses, and community organizations all played a role in building community this Saturday in Lansing, Illinois, as the photos below show.

Garage Sale at Oak Glen Elementary School

Saturday in Lansing
For the first time in five years, the annual garage sale at Oak Glen Elementary School (2101 182nd Street) was held outside, in deference to COVID-19. Though it’s called a garage sale, all the items are free. (Photo: Melanie Jongsma)
The Oak Glen garage sale originally started as a way to give away baby items and children’s clothes, but it now includes clothing of all sizes, household items, backpacks, and anything that people are finished using and would like to give to someone else. (Photo: Melanie Jongsma)
Oak Glen teachers and staff set up for the garage sale Friday night, filling the tables and leaving them indoors until Saturday morning. Top row, from left: John Bruner, Sally Reynolds, Allison Kwiatkoski, Karrie White, Sara Fortin. Bottom row, from left: Sharon Cialdella, Katie Larson, Bridgett Annicks. (Photo provided)

Shredding Day at the Lansing Municipal Center

Saturday in Lansing
Though approximately 50 cars were lined up along Ridge Road before 9:00am to take advantage of the Shredding Event hosted by the Village of Lansing, by 10:00am Village staff and elected officials had streamlined participants into a two-lane system in the parking lot to minimize congestion. (Photo: Melanie Jongsma)
The contactless system had drivers remain in their vehicles while volunteers checked for Village of Lansing stickers and then ensured that the shreddables were positioned in the trunk. (Photo: Melanie Jongsma)
Saturday shredding event
Organizer Vivian Payne gives directions to a would-be shredder who missed the correct parking lot entrance. Payne estimated that about 300 cars came to the event. (Photo: Melanie Jongsma)
Saturday shredding event
“It’s always such a great event that is so appreciated by our residents!” said event organizer Vivian Payne. “And we are fortunate to be able to work with vendors who sponsor the event and are always willing to give back to our community!” (Photo: Melanie Jongsma)

We Are Lansing food giveaway at First United Methodist Church

Saturday in Lansing
When the process of getting over a thousand boxes of food off the truck proved more difficult than anticipated, Public Works stepped in and used its equipment to help out. Volunteers were unloading boxes by 7:30 a.m. on Saturday. (Photo: Melanie Jongsma)
Saturday in Lansing
Volunteers gathered for instructions and prayer in the First United Methodist Church parking lot before starting to distribute over 1,000 boxes of food at the second We Are Lansing Food Drive. The food drive started serving cars a few minutes before 11 a.m. (Photo: Melanie Jongsma)
Saturday in Lansing
Most boxes contained milk, apples, onions, carrots, butter, meat, boxed goods, and more. The boxes came through the United States Department of Agriculture’s “Farmers to Families” program. Event Organizer Cam Sanchez said he received the boxes from Convoy of Hope in Chicago. (Photo: Josh Bootsma)
Food Drive
As cars rolled into the parking lot, organizer Cam Sanchez directed traffic. Sanchez is a TF South student, and this summer he organized a similar event that gave away 350 bags of food. (Photo: Josh Bootsma)
As the food drive started, the line of cards stretched from the parking lot entrance on Burnham Avenue to Ann Street (left photo), to Greenbay Avenue (center), to Schultz Drive. (Photos: Josh Bootsma)
Food Drive
Volunteers gave drivers sheets to fill out to indicate how much food each driver needed. Cars then parked in two lines in the parking lot, with food boxes in the middle. Eight cars were loaded at a time. (Photo: Josh Bootsma)
Food Drive
Joshua Piwowar loads a box of food into a van as his mom Amy looks on. “I’m tired of sitting in the house. I’m here to do something positive,” Amy said. She and Joshua checked each car’s sheet and loaded the cars accordingly. (Photo: Josh Bootsma)
Food Drive
Joshua Piwowar (right) said his mom Amy woke him up this morning and told him they’d be helping at the food drive. “It’s quite the experience, I’ve always wanted to help out a pantry,” Joshua said. “It sounded like fun and it is fun.” (Photo: Josh Bootsma)
Food Drive
Pastor Dave Price of First United Methodist Church prayed for each group of people as their cars were being loaded with food. (Photo: Josh Bootsma)
Saturday in Lansing
Justin Morgan (left) and Miles McGee pause for a photo in-between loading shifts. Both have been friends with Cam Sanchez since elementary school. “I always support everything [Cam] does,” McGee said. “We’re helping the community so I might as well [help too],” Morgan said. Both young men were part of the first shift of volunteers, which started around 7 a.m. The second shift started around noon. (Photo: Josh Bootsma)
Food Drive
Bruce Ross has lived in Lansing for 61 years, but has never seen a food drive like Saturday’s. Ross heard about the food drive from First United Methodist Church, where he attends. When asked why he wanted to come out and volunteer, Ross patted his heart. “The way the politicians and epidemic has gone–I feel I’m a Christian, and this is where I belong, helping where I can,” he said. (Photo: Josh Bootsma)
Food Drive
Cam Sanchez was proud to give away over 1,000 boxes of food by around 2:00 in the afternoon. “The world is in a unique spot right now and if it’s in my ability or power to give back to the community I’m from, or just anyone in general, that’s what I’m going to do. … My goal is to give back. I’d rather give than take,” he said. (Photo: Josh Bootsma)

Early Voting at the Lansing Public Library

(Note: In an earlier article we incorrectly stated that the library is closed for voting on Sunday, October 25. In fact, Early Voting will be available at the library from 9:00am–5:00pm.)

Saturday in Lansing
For the sixth day in a row, Early Voting lines stretched down Indiana Avenue. (Photo: Melanie Jongsma)
Saturday in Lansing
More than 400 people cast their votes on Saturday. Polling place staff reported that about half of the voters at the Lansing library were from Lansing and Lynwood, and the other half were from surrounding towns in Cook County. (Photo: Melanie Jongsma)
Saturday in Lansing
At 5:00pm today, closing time, a poll worker brought a “last voter” sign out to Valorie and Lennard Vigilant, who were the last in line. Workers would remain at their stations until everyone in line at 5:00pm had completed voting. The polls reopen on Sunday, October 25, from 9:00am–5:00pm. (Photo: Melanie Jongsma)

Promenade at the Pointe

Saturday in Lansing
On Saturday evening, Fox Pointe opened its doors for the first Village event since the pandemic started. “Promenade at the Pointe” featured local food, lights, music, and scarecrows decorated by Lansing residents and organizations. (Photo: Josh Bootsma)
Saturday in Lansing
The Lansing Historical Society had multiple scarecrow entries, including this recreation of American Gothic. Voting for the best scarecrow is open Monday–Friday this week from 6 – 8 p.m. and on Oct. 31 during the Village’s Halloween event from 2-4 p.m. Winners will be announced on the 31st. (Photo: Josh Bootsma)
Saturday in Lansing
Kristin (left) and Ryan Russell pose with their one-year-old little lobster Hayes. (Photo: Josh Bootsma)
Saturday in Lansing
The District 158 scarecrow is ready for another day of remote learning. (Photo: Josh Bootsma)
Saturday in Lansing
Brothers Raen (scary bear), Chance, (butchered pig), and Zion (Scream mask) Williams pose in their costumes. (Photo: Josh Bootsma)
Saturday in Lansing
Mayor Eidam served hot chocolate to attendees at Promenade at the Pointe. The Village was eager to use the venue after a summer full of concerts was cancelled due to the pandemic. (Photo: Josh Bootsma)

After two hours of socializing over Boz Hot Dogs and Mancino’s Pizza, costumed attendees were invited to line up near the Fox Pointe stage and prepared to promenade along the pavement and through the pavilion:


One of the Indiana newspapers covered the story of Lansing’s food giveaway but ignored the rest of the news happening in our community. Only a very local newspaper covers very local news—and we can do that only with the support of our local readers. If you’d like to join your neighbors and friends in supporting this local newspaper, please use the link below:

3 COMMENTS

  1. Great coverage of the best of our town! So proud I live in this community and have a newspaper that covers it all.

    People let’s give the Journal a little help to keep it going!

  2. Thank you, Toni and Mary Beth. We love being part of a community of people who figure out creative ways to support each other. But you’re right—we are able to provide this coverage only because the community supports us as well! I have added a link at the bottom of the article to make it easy for readers who enjoy this kind of coverage to sign up as supporters.

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