Neighborhood Watch meetings—info updated 4/13/18

33

All Lansing residents welcome at any Beat meeting

by Melanie Jongsma

LANSING, Ill. (April 13, 2018) – The Village of Lansing is divided into four beats, as shown on the map below. Each beat has a Neighborhood Watch meeting four times a year, led by a Lieutenant from the Lansing Police Department. Any Lansing resident can participate in any Neighborhood Watch meeting—renters, homeowners, landlords, and businesses are all welcome.

2018 Neighborhood Watch meetings

Beat 1

Meetings take place in the Lansing Police Department Courtroom, at 2710 170th Street. The Beat 1 Team Leader is Lt. Mizner: [email protected]

  • February 7, 6:30pm
  • May 16, 6:30pm
  • August 22, 6:30pm
  • November 28, 6:30pm

Beat 2
The Beat 2 Team Leader is Lt. Hoving: [email protected]

  • February 19, 6:30pm, at the Lansing Police Department Courtroom (2710 170th Street)
  • May 15, 6:30pm, at Rotary Park (193rd and Sherman Street) in the Northeast pavilion, next to the parking lot
  • September 18, 6:30pm, at Rotary Park (193rd and Sherman Street) in the Northeast pavilion, next to the parking lot
  • November 15, 6:30pm, at the Lansing Police Department Courtroom (2710 170th Street)

Beat 3
Meetings take place in the Lansing Police Department Courtroom, at 2710 170th Street. The Beat 3 Team Leader is Lt. Biron: [email protected]

  • January 31, 6:30pm
  • April 11, 6:30pm
  • August 15, 6:30pm
  • December 5, 6:30pm

Beat 4
The meeting place has been changed to the Lansing Public Library (2750 Indiana Avenue), in the lower-level community room on the north side of the building. The Beat 4 Team Leader is Lt. Phillips: [email protected]

  • March 15, 6:30pm
  • June 6, 6:30pm
  • September 26, 6:30pm
  • December 12, 6:30pm
Neighborhood Watch
Lansing residents are encouraged to participate in Neighborhood Watch meetings in any of Lansing’s four beats.

Building community

Lt. Scott Bailey says Neighborhood Watches are important because they have been shown to dramatically decrease the number of burglaries and related offenses by rebuilding community connections and encouraging neighbors to look out for one another. “Neighborhood Watches help build pride in community,” said Bailey.

At a typical Neighborhood Watch meeting, the officer serving as Team Leader will distribute a Crime Blotter that shows recent activity in the beat. This information is also posted on the Village website. Residents are encouraged to ask questions and provide additional information.

Keeping info current

If changes are made to the meeting dates or locations, the Lansing Police Department shares the new information as quickly as possible. As The Lansing Journal receives updates, we replace previous posts so that only the current information will come up in a search.

2 COMMENTS

Comments are closed.